Potent Dreadful Synthetic Cannabinoids – Research Chemicals;01

       Potent Dreadful Synthetic Cannabinoids – Research Chemicals

Synthetic cannabinoids – Fire Brand Chemicals; The recreational use of synthetic cannabinoids has recently increased.

This increase is due, in part, to the recent availability of inexpensive compound sold legally online in bulk. In particular, JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole) and JWH-073 (1-butyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole) have been found in herbal blends marketed as alternatives to cannabis.

Although these particular compounds have recently been emergency scheduled in the United States, online suppliers have shifted sales to other, similar compounds that are not currently scheduled. However, the purity of the drugs obtained from online suppliers is not known.

Relative purity of JWH-018 and JWH-073 from three different online suppliers was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and validated standards obtained from a traditional research chemical supplier.

Our results show that JWH-018 and JWH-073 obtained from online vendors was of comparable purity to validated standards, even though the physical properties varied in color, texture, and odor.

It is concluded that adverse events following consumption of synthetic cannabinoids preparations is unlikely to be due to impurities or residue from the manufacturing process.

But rather to effects of the active drug or interactions with other psychoactive chemicals from herbs blended into products marketed as cannabis alternatives.

Over the past several years, a new class of psychoactive substances has emerged from the drug market.[1–3]

These Novel Psychoactive Substances (NPS) are defined as “a new narcotic or psychotropic drug, in pure form or in preparation, that is not controlled by the United Nations drug conventions.

But which may pose a public health threat comparable to that posed by substances listed in these conventions” [1].

The largest and most popular group of NPS is Synthetic Cannabinoids (SC). SC are used as a ‘legal’ alternative to Cannabis, which means that they produce similar psychotropic effects to those of Δ9-THC.

These substances are easily bought on internet shops and both blends or ‘research chemicals’ come in packets [2,3]. These packets are advertised as containing a certain SC pure. Usually, pure substances from synthesis are very expensive.

On contrary, SC 1g packets are sold for 10€ or less. In the present study, a SC called THJ-018 was bought in the internet as a ‘research chemical’ and its content was assessed by GC/MS and HPLC/DAD.

Some of the many street names of K2/Spice synthetic marijuana are: • “Spice, K2, Blaze, RedX Dawn, Paradise, Demon, Black Magic, Spike, Mr. Nice Guy, Ninja, Zohai, Dream, Genie, Sence, Smoke, Skunk, Serenity, Yucatan, Fire, and Crazy Clown.

Chemicals designed to act like the main psychoactive chemical in cannabis

Also called:

  • Amsterdam Gold
  • Annihilation
  • Black Mamba
  • Blue Cheese
  • Bombay Blue Extreme
  • Clockwork Orange
  • Devil’s Weed
  • Ecsess
  • Exodus Damnation
  • Mary Joy
  • Spice
  • Tai High Hawaiian Haze
  • X

What does it look like?

In their pure form, synthetic cannabinoids are either solids or oils. They are then added to dried herbs, vegetable matter or plant cuttings to make a smoking mixture (so that it looks more like real herbal cannabis).

The most commonly known synthetic cannabinoid is Spice.

The smoking mixtures are packaged in small, often colourful sachets with labels describing the contents as incense or herbal smoking mixture, and usually stating ‘not for human consumption’.

There are many different names given to herbal smoking mixtures, some of the most common are listed in the ‘Also called’ section at the top of the page.

There are many different brand names for smoking mixtures, but it is not uncommon for different brands to contain the same synthetic cannabinoids.

How Synthetic Canabionoids is taken;

Synthetic cannabinoids are normally used in a similar way to cannabis:

  • They can be mixed with tobacco, rolled up into a spliff or joint, and then smoked.
  • They can be smoked without tobacco using a pipe or bong.
  • As e-cigarettes have become more available, there are reports of some people using e-cig technology for synthetic cannabinoids, and that e-liquids containing synthetic cannabinoids have been produced that can be used with normal e-cigs.
  • They can also be swallowed, eaten with food or made into a drink.

How does it make you feel?

Since synthetic cannabinoids act like cannabis, the effects – good and bad – are similar. Some users will feel happy and relaxed, may get the giggles, feel hunger pangs and become very talkative. Others mainly feel ill or paranoid.

Because synthetic cannabinoids react more strongly with the brain’s cannabis receptors they’re more potent than natural cannabis. This means it’s easier to use too much and experience unpleasant and harmful effects.

Synthetic cannabinoids act like THC, the active substance in natural cannabis, but are often more potent, so it’s easier to use too much and experience unpleasant and harmful effects.

Typical effects include:

  • Feelings of being happy, euphoric and relaxed, with some people gettings the giggles, feeling hunger pangs and becoming very talkative, while others get more drowsy.
  • Mood and perception can change, and concentration and coordination may become difficult. Synthetic cannabinoids, possibly because of their potency, are more likely to be associated with hallucinations than natural cannabis.
  • Some will have quite bad reactions, such as paranoia, panic attacks and forgetfulness.

Duration of Synthetic Canabinoids

How long the effects last and the drug stays in your system depends on how much you’ve taken, your size and what other drugs you may have also taken.

Is it dangerous to mix with other drugs?

Mixing synthetic cannabinoids with alcohol or other drugs can be especially dangerous. It can increase the risks of both drugs and can lead to a greater risk of accidents or death.

Also, because synthetic cannabinoids can overstimulate the serotonin system, it is important to avoid mixing them with antidepressants, such as Prozac.

As they both stimulate serotonin activity in the brain, which can lead to serotonin syndrome, causing high fever, rapid pulse, sweating, agitation, confusion, convulsions, organ failure, coma and even death.

Can you get addicted?

Research suggests that you can become dependent on synthetic cannabinoids, especially if you use them regularly.

Whether or not you’re dependent will be influenced by a number of factors, including how long you’ve been using it, how much you use and whether you are just more prone to becoming dependent.

If you have used synthetic cannabinoids regularly you could find it difficult to stop using and you might experience psychological and physical withdrawals when you do stop.

The withdrawals can include cravings for synthetic cannabinoids, irritability, mood changes, loss of appetite, weight loss, difficulty sleeping and even sweating, shaking and diarrhoea.

Class: Psychoactive Substances

  • Some volatile substances are covered by the 2016 Psychoactive Substances Act, which means it’s illegal to give away or sell.
  • There’s no penalty for possession, unless you’re in prison.
  • Supply and production can get you up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both.

Like drink-driving, driving when high is dangerous and illegal. If you’re caught driving under the influence, you may receive a heavy fine, driving ban, or prison sentence.

If the police catch people supplying illegal drugs in a home, club, bar or hostel, they can potentially prosecute the landlord, club owner or any other person concerned in the management of the premises.

Additional law details

Synthetic cannabinoids and the law

  • Although some synthetic cannabinoids have been legal in the past, many have been illegal for some time. A large number of synthetic cannabinoids and any mixtures that contain illegal drugs, including brands like Black Mamba and Annihilation, are Class B drugs and are illegal to have, give away or sell.
  • It’s important to realise that since 26 May 2016, when the Psychoactive Substances Act came into effect, none of these drugs are legal to produce, supply or import (even for personal use, e.g. over the internet) for human consumption.
  • The synthetic cannabinoids that were made illegal under the Misuse of Drugs Act, are still covered by that legislation. All other psychoactive substances not currently covered by the Misuse of Drugs Act now fall under the Psychoactive Substances Act.

 

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Description

       Potent Dreadful Synthetic Cannabinoids – Research Chemicals

Synthetic cannabinoids – Fire Brand Chemicals; The recreational use of synthetic cannabinoids has recently increased.

This increase is due, in part, to the recent availability of inexpensive compound sold legally online in bulk. In particular, JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole) and JWH-073 (1-butyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole) have been found in herbal blends marketed as alternatives to cannabis.

Although these particular compounds have recently been emergency scheduled in the United States, online suppliers have shifted sales to other, similar compounds that are not currently scheduled. However, the purity of the drugs obtained from online suppliers is not known.

Relative purity of JWH-018 and JWH-073 from three different online suppliers was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and validated standards obtained from a traditional research chemical supplier.

Our results show that JWH-018 and JWH-073 obtained from online vendors was of comparable purity to validated standards, even though the physical properties varied in color, texture, and odor.

It is concluded that adverse events following consumption of synthetic cannabinoids preparations is unlikely to be due to impurities or residue from the manufacturing process.

But rather to effects of the active drug or interactions with other psychoactive chemicals from herbs blended into products marketed as cannabis alternatives.

Over the past several years, a new class of psychoactive substances has emerged from the drug market.[1–3]

These Novel Psychoactive Substances (NPS) are defined as “a new narcotic or psychotropic drug, in pure form or in preparation, that is not controlled by the United Nations drug conventions.

But which may pose a public health threat comparable to that posed by substances listed in these conventions” [1].

The largest and most popular group of NPS is Synthetic Cannabinoids (SC). SC are used as a ‘legal’ alternative to Cannabis, which means that they produce similar psychotropic effects to those of Δ9-THC.

These substances are easily bought on internet shops and both blends or ‘research chemicals’ come in packets [2,3]. These packets are advertised as containing a certain SC pure. Usually, pure substances from synthesis are very expensive.

On contrary, SC 1g packets are sold for 10€ or less. In the present study, a SC called THJ-018 was bought in the internet as a ‘research chemical’ and its content was assessed by GC/MS and HPLC/DAD.

Some of the many street names of K2/Spice synthetic marijuana are: • “Spice, K2, Blaze, RedX Dawn, Paradise, Demon, Black Magic, Spike, Mr. Nice Guy, Ninja, Zohai, Dream, Genie, Sence, Smoke, Skunk, Serenity, Yucatan, Fire, and Crazy Clown.

Chemicals designed to act like the main psychoactive chemical in cannabis

Also called:

  • Amsterdam Gold
  • Annihilation
  • Black Mamba
  • Blue Cheese
  • Bombay Blue Extreme
  • Clockwork Orange
  • Devil’s Weed
  • Ecsess
  • Exodus Damnation
  • Mary Joy
  • Spice
  • Tai High Hawaiian Haze
  • X

What does it look like?

In their pure form, synthetic cannabinoids are either solids or oils. They are then added to dried herbs, vegetable matter or plant cuttings to make a smoking mixture (so that it looks more like real herbal cannabis).

The most commonly known synthetic cannabinoid is Spice.

The smoking mixtures are packaged in small, often colourful sachets with labels describing the contents as incense or herbal smoking mixture, and usually stating ‘not for human consumption’.

There are many different names given to herbal smoking mixtures, some of the most common are listed in the ‘Also called’ section at the top of the page.

There are many different brand names for smoking mixtures, but it is not uncommon for different brands to contain the same synthetic cannabinoids.

How Synthetic Canabionoids is taken;

Synthetic cannabinoids are normally used in a similar way to cannabis:

  • They can be mixed with tobacco, rolled up into a spliff or joint, and then smoked.
  • They can be smoked without tobacco using a pipe or bong.
  • As e-cigarettes have become more available, there are reports of some people using e-cig technology for synthetic cannabinoids, and that e-liquids containing synthetic cannabinoids have been produced that can be used with normal e-cigs.
  • They can also be swallowed, eaten with food or made into a drink.

How does it make you feel?

Since synthetic cannabinoids act like cannabis, the effects – good and bad – are similar. Some users will feel happy and relaxed, may get the giggles, feel hunger pangs and become very talkative. Others mainly feel ill or paranoid.

Because synthetic cannabinoids react more strongly with the brain’s cannabis receptors they’re more potent than natural cannabis. This means it’s easier to use too much and experience unpleasant and harmful effects.

Synthetic cannabinoids act like THC, the active substance in natural cannabis, but are often more potent, so it’s easier to use too much and experience unpleasant and harmful effects.

Typical effects include:

  • Feelings of being happy, euphoric and relaxed, with some people gettings the giggles, feeling hunger pangs and becoming very talkative, while others get more drowsy.
  • Mood and perception can change, and concentration and coordination may become difficult. Synthetic cannabinoids, possibly because of their potency, are more likely to be associated with hallucinations than natural cannabis.
  • Some will have quite bad reactions, such as paranoia, panic attacks and forgetfulness.

Duration of Synthetic Canabinoids

How long the effects last and the drug stays in your system depends on how much you’ve taken, your size and what other drugs you may have also taken.

Is it dangerous to mix with other drugs?

Mixing synthetic cannabinoids with alcohol or other drugs can be especially dangerous. It can increase the risks of both drugs and can lead to a greater risk of accidents or death.

Also, because synthetic cannabinoids can overstimulate the serotonin system, it is important to avoid mixing them with antidepressants, such as Prozac.

As they both stimulate serotonin activity in the brain, which can lead to serotonin syndrome, causing high fever, rapid pulse, sweating, agitation, confusion, convulsions, organ failure, coma and even death.

Can you get addicted?

Research suggests that you can become dependent on synthetic cannabinoids, especially if you use them regularly.

Whether or not you’re dependent will be influenced by a number of factors, including how long you’ve been using it, how much you use and whether you are just more prone to becoming dependent.

If you have used synthetic cannabinoids regularly you could find it difficult to stop using and you might experience psychological and physical withdrawals when you do stop.

The withdrawals can include cravings for synthetic cannabinoids, irritability, mood changes, loss of appetite, weight loss, difficulty sleeping and even sweating, shaking and diarrhoea.

Class: Psychoactive Substances

  • Some volatile substances are covered by the 2016 Psychoactive Substances Act, which means it’s illegal to give away or sell.
  • There’s no penalty for possession, unless you’re in prison.
  • Supply and production can get you up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both.

Like drink-driving, driving when high is dangerous and illegal. If you’re caught driving under the influence, you may receive a heavy fine, driving ban, or prison sentence.

If the police catch people supplying illegal drugs in a home, club, bar or hostel, they can potentially prosecute the landlord, club owner or any other person concerned in the management of the premises.

Additional law details

Synthetic cannabinoids and the law

  • Although some synthetic cannabinoids have been legal in the past, many have been illegal for some time. A large number of synthetic cannabinoids and any mixtures that contain illegal drugs, including brands like Black Mamba and Annihilation, are Class B drugs and are illegal to have, give away or sell.
  • It’s important to realise that since 26 May 2016, when the Psychoactive Substances Act came into effect, none of these drugs are legal to produce, supply or import (even for personal use, e.g. over the internet) for human consumption.
  • The synthetic cannabinoids that were made illegal under the Misuse of Drugs Act, are still covered by that legislation. All other psychoactive substances not currently covered by the Misuse of Drugs Act now fall under the Psychoactive Substances Act.

 

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